Breaking Writing Sterotypes

Every genre has its writing stereotypes. This morning I came across a tweet decrying and asking people to leave a comment at this man’s blog in view of his post making fun of romance novels and readers. The post actually made me laugh as did some the comments–and yes, I do read and write romances.

The one thing I realized while reading his blog was that the people who commented live day in and day out with untrue writing stereotypes. They were fed up with people making fun of their hard work, but very few of those people were actually trying to break away from the stigma that they were so anger about.

Why? You might ask. Because traditional publishers dictated what rules they have to follow. Different is good. But not too different. Unique stories are welcome, but not always accepted.

As self-published authors, we are in the position to write what we like. We can move away from the writing stereotypes we don’t like. We can break the genre rules and take chances.

Please share the stereotypes you would like to see broken or changed, that you like, or that you hate. If you have a related post, let us know.

12 thoughts on “Breaking Writing Sterotypes

  1. I don’t have a related post, but this is a fascinating topic. Self-publishing offers a break from stereotypes. Books publishers will never take a chance on can be published anyway. 😀

    Let’s see…

    Stereotypes I’d like to see dismantled:

    1. Romance books are trash and authors who write them are pathetic, lonely, and depressed (or however it was portrayed in the blog post you read).

    2. Vampire books are spin off of Twilight and people who write them want to be the next Stephanie Meyer. In my experience, few authors want to be carbon copies of another author.

    3. People who write “literary works” write “real books” and are better than other authors who write the “meaningless genres”. Please. At the end of the day, it’s whether or not the author had you glued to every page of the book that counts, not the poetic language.

    I’m not familiar with other stereotypes except the creepy people who write horror novels that you mentioned on your other post. 😀

    What stereotype do I like? I guess the one that says romance authors have too much sex. That one sounds great to me. 😉

    Like

  2. As Ruth said, I’m sick of the idea that vampire books are for teenagers just because Twilight and a slew of coat tail books (aka authors riding on Twilight’s success) are. Yes, I read vampires as a teenager, but except Christopher Pike’s they were the adult vampire books.

    However, I am thinking of embracing some of those cool vampire author stereotypes. Like getting to wear all black all the time. Black’s really slimming, after all. and then I could get a cool Morticia Adams like dress. That could be fun. 🙂

    Like

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